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Side Effects of Etodolac Extended-Release - Subsys Withdrawal

This page contains links to eMedTV Pain Articles containing information on subjects from Side Effects of Etodolac Extended-Release to Subsys Withdrawal. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Side Effects of Etodolac Extended-Release
    Possible side effects of etodolac extended-release include gas, itching, and diarrhea. This eMedTV resource also contains a list of less common side effects that may occur, as well as serious problems that should be reported to a doctor immediately.
  • Side Effects of Fentanyl
    Headaches, drowsiness, and constipation are among the most common side effects of fentanyl. This eMedTV segment further discusses the side effects of this drug, including a list of serious problems that you should report immediately to your doctor.
  • Side Effects of Fentanyl Buccal Tablets
    As this eMedTV page explains, fentanyl buccal tablets can cause side effects such as vomiting, dizziness, and nausea. This article lists many other side effects, including serious problems you should report immediately to your healthcare provider.
  • Side Effects of Mefenamic Acid
    This eMedTV resource provides a list of common side effects of mefenamic acid, including headache, dizziness, and diarrhea. Other rare but possible side effects are also listed, such as hepatitis, depression, and insomnia.
  • Side Effects of Meloxicam
    Among the side effects of meloxicam listed on this eMedTV page are common side effects like gas, nausea, and headache; rare side effects like anxiety and pancreatitis; and side effects requiring emergency medical attention, such as slurred speech.
  • Side Effects of Metaxalone
    Common side effects of metaxalone include dizziness, nausea, and drowsiness. This eMedTV resource takes a closer look at other common metaxalone side effects and describes which ones you should report to a healthcare provider right away.
  • Side Effects of Oxaprozin
    This eMedTV article lists potential side effects of oxaprozin that may develop, including nausea, dizziness, stomach pain, or swelling. There are also more serious side effects that may occur, such as congestive heart failure or liver damage.
  • Side Effects of Oxycodone/APAP
    Although most people do not have any problems with oxycodone/APAP, side effects are possible. This eMedTV article lists some of the more common side effects of oxycodone/APAP, as well as potentially serious ones that may need medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Pegloticase
    This eMedTV page explains that nausea, bruising, and vomiting are some of the common side effects of pegloticase. This article offers a more detailed list of reactions that may occur, including those that are potentially serious and require medical care.
  • Side Effects of Sumatriptan/Naproxen Sodium
    Nausea, dry mouth, and dizziness are some of the common side effects of sumatriptan/naproxen sodium. This eMedTV resource lists other possible side effects, including potentially serious ones that require medical attention (such as seizures).
  • Side Effects of Tapentadol ER
    Among the commonly reported tapentadol ER side effects are headaches, nausea, and constipation. This eMedTV page offers an overview of other possible reactions, listing common ones as well potentially serious problems that require medical treatment.
  • Side Effects of Tramadol Hydrochloride
    Common side effects of tramadol hydrochloride may include constipation, nausea, and drowsiness. This eMedTV Web page lists other side effects seen with the drug, including potentially serious side effects that require immediate medical care.
  • Side Effects of Tramadol/Acetaminophen
    Potential side effects of tramadol/acetaminophen include fatigue, loss of appetite, and nausea. This eMedTV resource lists other possible side effects, including common (and usually mild) side effects and rare (but potentially serious) side effects.
  • Side Effects With Anaprox
    Common Anaprox side effects include heartburn, headache, and dizziness. This page of the eMedTV archives also lists uncommon side effects, like diarrhea and indigestion, and serious side effects, like congestive heart failure and liver damage.
  • Signs of Hydrocodone/APAP Addiction
    While it can be difficult to tell if a person is showing signs of hydrocodone/APAP addiction, this eMedTV resource provides possible indications that healthcare providers and friends and family can look for, and stresses the need to seek help.
  • Signs of Norco Addiction
    This eMedTV segment takes a look at possible signs of a Norco addiction, such as "doctor shopping" and going through a prescription too quickly. This page also explains why it can be difficult to distinguish between addiction and physical dependence.
  • Signs of OxyContin Abuse
    "Doctor shopping" is often a good indication of OxyContin addiction or abuse. As this page from the eMedTV archives explains, there are many other common signs of abusing OxyContin (such as going through prescriptions too quickly and secluded behavior).
  • Signs of Vicodin Addiction
    If you are going through a Vicodin prescription too quickly, you may be addicted to the drug. This eMedTV page lists possible signs of a Vicodin addiction and offers suggestions on what to do if you or someone else appears to be addicted to Vicodin.
  • Skin Disorders
    Infections, nerve damage, inflammation, autoimmune disease, and trauma are just a few of the many causes of painful skin disorders. For example, herpes zoster (shingles) is a viral infection that can cause painful burning sensations of the skin. Trauma or burns can cause the nerves of the skin to have a heightened sense of pain, even after the initial injury heals. Inflammatory disorders like psoriasis can cause sensitive, painful, and itchy skin. Treatment varies, depending on the cause of the skin disorder, but often creams or ointments (either over-the-counter or prescription) are an effective therapy for this type of pain.
  • Sleep and Fibromyalgia
    Sleep and fibromyalgia can be related, since many people with fibromyalgia also have sleep problems. This eMedTV page lists suggestions for better sleep -- such as keeping regular sleep habits and avoiding caffeine in the late afternoon and evening.
  • Snorting Lortab
    As a narcotic medication, Lortab has a significant potential for abuse. As this eMedTV Web page explains, snorting Lortab is a popular way to abuse the prescription pain medicine. This article also discusses the dangers of abusing Lortab.
  • Snorting Opana ER
    If you misuse Opana ER by snorting or injecting it, dangerous and even fatal problems may occur. This eMedTV article describes possible complications that may occur when abusing this drug and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Snorting Tramadol
    Some people may abuse tramadol by snorting or injecting the medication. This article from the eMedTV archives explains that abuse is different from a simple, physical dependence on the drug and describes where to find help for this addiction.
  • Snorting Vicodin
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, some people may abuse Vicodin by snorting or injecting the medication. This article explains that abusing Vicodin can lead to dangerous complications, such as breathing problems, liver damage, and even death.
  • Soboxone
    This eMedTV Web resource explains how Suboxone can help treat opioid dependence. This page also describes factors that may affect your dose and lists some general precautions with the drug. Soboxone is a common misspelling of Suboxone.
  • Sometimes I'm Stalling, Sometimes I'm Not
    "The stall" is the pharmacist's classic tool for dealing with suspicious prescriptions. I might tell you there is a problem with your insurance or that there will be a long wait because the pharmacy is busy. Meanwhile, my colleague is in the back room, busily determining if your prescription is legitimate, or, in some cases, calling the police. However, especially if there is no reason for suspicion, the truth is probably that there really is a problem with your insurance or that the pharmacy truly is busy.
  • Spinal Pain
    Spinal pain is caused by a number of problems, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, or injury. Because the spine helps to protect nerves that produce feeling throughout the body and plays such a significant role in the structure and function of the human body, spinal pain often leads to pain in other areas. Treating the underlying cause of the spinal pain is important to prevent worsening of the condition. A number of tests can help determine the cause and will help to direct further treatment decisions.
  • Sprix
    Available by prescription only, Sprix is a drug approved for treating moderate to moderately severe pain. This eMedTV page offers an overview of this nasal spray, including details on how it works, how effective it is, potential side effects, and more.
  • Sprix and Breastfeeding
    Sprix (ketorolac nasal spray) may not be safe to use while nursing a child. This eMedTV page discusses Sprix and breastfeeding, including information on whether this medication passes through breast milk and the potential risks to a breastfed infant.
  • Sprix and Pregnancy
    Before using Sprix (ketorolac nasal spray), pregnant women should understand the potential risks. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at this topic, including details on some of the problems that occurred when this drug was given to pregnant animals.
  • Sprix Dosage
    For pain relief, spray one drop of Sprix into each nostril every six to eight hours. This selection from the eMedTV Web site covers the dosing guidelines for Sprix, including important recommendations for when and how to use this nasal spray.
  • Sprix Drug Interactions
    Diuretics and lithium are some of the drugs that can cause negative interactions with Sprix. This eMedTV page lists several other medicines that may lead to complications when taken with Sprix and describes the problems that may occur.
  • Sprix Medication Information
    This eMedTV Web article provides some basic information on Sprix, a medication used to treat moderate to moderately severe pain. This resource also explains how this prescription medicine works and why it may not be the best choice for some people.
  • Sprix Overdose
    If you use too much Sprix (ketorolac nasal spray), potentially serious reactions may occur. This eMedTV Web selection describes what to expect with an overdose, including possible symptoms and details on how a doctor may treat these problems.
  • Sprix Side Effects
    Nasal discomfort and throat irritation are common reactions that can occur with Sprix. This eMedTV article describes other potential side effects of Sprix, with information on how often they occur and which reactions require immediate medical care.
  • Sprix Uses
    If you have moderate to moderately severe pain, you may benefit from Sprix. This page from the eMedTV Web library takes a closer look at what Sprix is used for, including how it works for short-term pain relief and whether it is safe for use in children.
  • Sprix Warnings and Precautions
    Using Sprix can cause liver, kidney, or cardiovascular problems. This eMedTV page lists other important precautions and warnings for Sprix, including what your doctor needs to know about your health situation and details on who should not use this drug.
  • Stagesic
    Stagesic is a medication that can be prescribed to help relieve moderate to moderately severe pain. This eMedTV segment describes the effects of Stagesic, explores the drug's potential for abuse, and lists potential side effects that may occur.
  • Stagesic Medication Information
    Stagesic is a narcotic that is used to treat pain. This portion of the eMedTV library takes a closer look at Stagesic, with information on how often the medication is taken and what kinds of side effects may occur. A link to more details is also included.
  • Subitex
    Subutex is a prescription opioid narcotic drug used to treat opioid dependence. This article from the eMedTV Web site describes how the medicine works, potential side effects, and how the tablets are taken. Subitex is a common misspelling of Subutex.
  • Subotex
    Subutex is a prescription drug approved for the treatment of opioid dependence. This eMedTV article describes how this medication works, lists possible side effects, and explains when and how to take it. Subotex is a common misspelling of Subutex.
  • Suboxane
    As this eMedTV Web article explains, a doctor may prescribe Suboxone to treat opioid dependence. This page also talks about the drug's potential for abuse and offers a link to more detailed information. Suboxane is a common misspelling of Suboxone.
  • Suboxon
    This selection from the eMedTV Web archives explains how Suboxone can help treat opioid dependence. This article also takes a brief look at the abuse potential and possible side effects of Suboxone. Suboxon is a common misspelling of Suboxone.
  • Suboxone
    Suboxone is a prescription medicine dissolved under the tongue once daily to treat opioid dependence. This eMedTV Web article provides an in-depth look at this narcotic medication, including how it works, when to use it, possible side effects, and more.
  • Suboxone Abuse
    Some people may abuse Suboxone, as this medication is an opioid narcotic. This section from the eMedTV Web archives explains why Suboxone abuse is different than a simple, physical dependence on the drug. A link to more details is also included.
  • Suboxone Administration
    Suboxone comes in the form of a tablet or film that is dissolved under the tongue once a day. This eMedTV resource discusses other important administration tips for Suboxone, including how to most effectively use this opioid medication.
  • Suboxone and Antidepressants
    Taking certain MAOIs or antidepressants with Suboxone can cause potentially serious problems. This eMedTV segment describes the complications that may occur when these drugs are taken with Suboxone. A link to more information is also included.
  • Suboxone and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV page takes a look at the risks of breastfeeding while using Suboxone (buprenorphine and naloxone). It explains the manufacturer's recommendations and describes the potentially serious complications the drug could cause in a breastfed infant.
  • Suboxone and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page explores the potential risks associated with Suboxone (buprenorphine and naloxone) and pregnancy. This page describes the problems that occurred during animal studies and explains when a doctor may recommend this drug to a pregnant woman.
  • Suboxone Detox
    If you are trying to stop taking opioid drugs, Suboxone may be recommended as part of your detox. This eMedTV Web selection takes a brief look at how this drug is beneficial for treating opioid dependence. A link to more details is also included.
  • Suboxone Doctors
    Before buying Suboxone, you must have a prescription from a doctor who is certified to prescribe this drug. This eMedTV segment explains why not all doctors are allowed to prescribe Suboxone. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Suboxone Dosage
    Suboxone comes in the form of a tablet or film, both of which dissolve under the tongue. This eMedTV article describes Suboxone dosing guidelines in more detail, including the factors that may affect your dose and some tips for how to use this opioid.
  • Suboxone Drug Interactions
    Suboxone can cause serious side effects if it is combined with certain medications. This eMedTV segment provides a closer look at the products that may cause drug interactions with Suboxone and describes the complications that can occur.
  • Suboxone Film
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Suboxone film and tablets are used to treat opioid dependence in adults. This page offers a brief overview of this prescription drug, including some tips on how to use it most effectively.
  • Suboxone Medication Information
    This part of eMedTV Web site provides information on Suboxone, a prescription medication used to treat opioid dependence in adults. This article gives a brief overview of how this product is used and provides a link to more details on this opioid drug.
  • Suboxone Overdose
    Seek immediate medical care if you believe you have overdosed on Suboxone (buprenorphine and naloxone). This eMedTV page lists possible symptoms that may occur if too much of this drug is used and describes the treatment options that are available.
  • Suboxone Side Effects
    Common side effects of Suboxone include constipation, nausea, and headaches. This article from the eMedTV Web library offers a detailed list of other possible reactions, including potentially serious problems that may require medical attention.
  • Suboxone Treatment
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Suboxone for the treatment of opioid dependence. This eMedTV segment offers a brief look at how this medication works and why it is less likely to be abused than other opioids. A link to more details is also included.
  • Suboxone Uses
    Suboxone is a prescription drug that helps treat opioid dependence. This eMedTV article further discusses what Suboxone is used for, including how the medicine works and whether it is safe for use in children. A list of off-label uses is also included.
  • Suboxone Warnings and Precautions
    People who have heart disease, lung disease, or low blood pressure may not be able to safely use Suboxone. This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at other important warnings and precautions to be aware of before beginning treatment with Suboxone.
  • Suboxone Withdrawal
    As this eMedTV article explains, symptoms of Suboxone (buprenorphine and naloxone) withdrawal are not necessarily a sign of abuse. This page provides more details on this topic, including possible withdrawal symptoms.
  • Suboxone Withdrawel
    As this eMedTV page explains, suddenly stopping Suboxone may lead to withdrawal symptoms, such as insomnia and hallucinations. Other symptoms of withdrawal from Suboxone are also listed. Suboxone withdrawel is a common misspelling of Suboxone withdrawal.
  • Suboxone Withdrawl
    If you stop taking Suboxone too quickly, it may lead to withdrawal symptoms. This eMedTV page lists possible symptoms of withdrawal from Suboxone and explains how they can be avoided. Suboxone withdrawl is a common misspelling of Suboxone withdrawal.
  • Subsys
    Subsys is a narcotic drug licensed for treating breakthrough cancer pain. This eMedTV Web selection contains an explanation of the effects of this painkiller, covers dosing information, lists potential side effects, and more.
  • Subsys Abuse
    Just like other narcotics, Subsys (fentanyl sublingual spray) has a high potential for abuse. This eMedTV segment examines possible signs of addiction to Subsys and describes the difference between addiction and a physical dependence on a medicine.
  • Subsys and Breastfeeding
    Subsys (fentanyl sublingual spray) has been shown to pass through breast milk. This eMedTV segment offers more details on breastfeeding and Subsys, and describes the potential complications that can occur if an infant is exposed to the drug.
  • Subsys and Pregnancy
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, Subsys (fentanyl sublingual spray) is a pregnancy Category C drug, meaning it may not be safe for use during pregnancy. This page describes complications that might occur, such as withdrawal symptoms in newborns.
  • Subsys Dosage
    The initial Subsys dosage for treating breakthrough cancer pain is usually 100 mcg. This eMedTV resource examines specific dosing guidelines for this pain reliever, including important recommendations on how to safely and effectively use this drug.
  • Subsys Drug Interactions
    If you drink grapefruit juice or alcohol while using Subsys, it may cause dangerous complications. This eMedTV page lists other products that may cause interactions with Subsys and describes the problems that may occur if these drugs are taken together.
  • Subsys Medication Information
    Subsys is a narcotic drug prescribed to treat breakthrough pain in adults with cancer. This eMedTV page explores Subsys, including information on why this medication may not be the best choice for some people. A link to more details is also included.
  • Subsys Overdose
    As this eMedTV resource explains, it is possible to overdose on Subsys (fentanyl sublingual spray). This article covers overdose symptoms and explains why it is important to seek immediate medical care if you think an overdose has occurred.
  • Subsys Side Effects
    Some of the common side effects of Subsys include constipation, drowsiness, and dizziness. This eMedTV article outlines a more detailed list of possible side effects, including potentially serious complications that require immediate medical care.
  • Subsys Storage and Disposal
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, store Subsys (fentanyl sublingual spray) in a safe place and dispose of it by using the disposal bag. This page contains important tips for how to properly store and dispose of this strong opiate medication.
  • Subsys Uses
    If you have cancer pain that breaks through around-the-clock pain medicine, you may benefit from Subsys. This eMedTV segment discusses the uses of Subsys in more detail, describes how the drug works, and explains whether it is approved for children.
  • Subsys Warnings and Precautions
    If you have any type of lung problem, let your doctor know before using Subsys. This eMedTV Web page contains important warnings and precautions for Subsys, including what your doctor needs to know and possible problems the drug can cause.
  • Subsys Withdrawal
    If you suddenly stop taking Subsys (fentanyl sublingual spray), withdrawal symptoms may occur. This eMedTV Web selection describes why withdrawal occurs and contains a list of possible symptoms, such as sweating, chills, and muscle pain.
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