Pain Articles A-Z

Indocin Medication - Ketoprofen and Pregnancy

This page contains links to eMedTV Pain Articles containing information on subjects from Indocin Medication to Ketoprofen and Pregnancy. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Indocin Medication
    Healthcare providers often prescribe Indocin as a treatment for arthritis symptoms. This eMedTV resource takes a closer look at this medication, explaining some of Indocin's potential side effects and listing some of the specific uses of the drug.
  • Indocin Precautions and Warnings
    Taking Indocin can increase the risk for high blood pressure, stomach ulcers, and congestive heart failure. This eMedTV Web page discusses other Indocin and precautions to be aware of, including those involving pregnancy and breastfeeding.
  • Indocin Side Effects
    Headache, heartburn, dizziness, and nausea are some of the common side effects of Indocin. This eMedTV article lists other possible reactions and identifies some problems that may require immediate medical attention, such as such as unusual bleeding.
  • Infant Acetaminophen
    Infant acetaminophen is an over-the-counter pain reliever and fever reducer for children under age three. This eMedTV page offers general dosing information for infant acetaminophen, lists possible side effects of the drug, and explains how it works.
  • Infant Acetaminophen Dosage
    If your child is under age 2, ask a doctor about infant acetaminophen dosage recommendations. As this eMedTV page explains, you need to talk to a doctor to determine the dosage for your infant. This article provides dosages for children ages 2 to 3.
  • Infant Acetaminophen Drug Information
    This eMedTV segment features information on infant acetaminophen, a drug that can help treat pain and other symptoms. It discusses how and when to give the medication and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Infant Acetaminophen Drug Interactions
    Medicines that may cause drug interactions with infant acetaminophen include isoniazid and warfarin. This eMedTV article lists other drugs that can cause infant acetaminophen interactions and explains how you can help prevent these interactions.
  • Infant Acetaminophen Side Effects
    Children taking too much infant acetaminophen may experience nausea, liver failure, or diarrhea. As this eMedTV Web page explains, in most cases, infant acetaminophen side effects occur only when a child is given too much of the medication.
  • Info on Sumatriptan/Naproxen Sodium
    This eMedTV segment gives some basic info on sumatriptan/naproxen sodium, a drug used to treat migraines. Topics covered in this article including dosing guidelines, side effects, and who can use it. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Information About Morphine
    As this eMedTV segment discusses, morphine is a component used in many prescription pain medications. This page offers an overview of important information about morphine, including general precautions and potential side effects of the medication.
  • Information on Children's Acetaminophen
    This segment of the eMedTV archives presents some important information on children's acetaminophen. It includes the age range for this product, dosing guidelines, and safety considerations to keep in mind when using it.
  • Information on Fibromyalgia
    This segment of the eMedTV archives provides information on fibromyalgia. It explains just how common this condition is, explores a possible cause, and discusses why treatment can be so difficult and can evolve throughout a person's life.
  • Ingredients in Tramadol
    Each tramadol (Ultram) tablet contains 50 mg of tramadol hydrochloride plus other inactive ingredients. This eMedTV page further describes other ingredients in tramadol and explains why generic versions of the drug can have several inactive ingredients.
  • Injecting Opana ER
    Some people may abuse Opana ER by injecting or snorting the medication. This selection from the eMedTV library discusses why this type of use may be fatal, and describes the difference between abusing a drug and being physically dependent on it.
  • Is Buprenorphine a Controlled Substance?
    As a controlled substance, buprenorphine is a medication whose use is strictly regulated. This eMedTV article offers more information on why this drug is sometimes abused and explains what you can do to avoid any problems with dependence.
  • Is Darvocet a Narcotic?
    As this eMedTV page explains, Darvocet (propoxyphene/acetaminophen) is a narcotic drug and is classified as a controlled substance. Although it is far less potent than most narcotics, it should not be viewed as a harmless drug.
  • Is Darvon a Narcotic?
    As this eMedTV page explains, Darvon is a type of narcotic that works to relieve pain. Darvon, as this article discusses, works to treat pain by affecting the brain and spinal cord. This page also explains why Darvon may be a desired drug of abuse.
  • Is Exercise Good for Chronic Pain?
    Just because you have chronic pain, it doesn't mean you can't (or shouldn't) exercise. This eMedTV resource presents some considerations to keep in mind when it comes to exercise and chronic pain, and suggests discussing the issue with your doctor.
  • Is Fibromyalgia a Disability?
    This eMedTV Web page explains that if your fibromyalgia prevents you from working, you may qualify for disability benefits, provided your situation meets certain criteria. This article addresses this topic with information on possible sources of help.
  • Is Meloxicam a Narcotic?
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, meloxicam is a type of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), not a narcotic. Meloxicam, as this article discusses, works to treat arthritis symptoms by blocking certain hormones in the body.
  • Is Motrin a Narcotic?
    As this eMedTV selection explains, Motrin is a type of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), rather than a narcotic. Motrin, as this article explains, works to treat mild to moderate pain by blocking certain hormones in the body.
  • Is Naprosyn a Narcotic?
    As this eMedTV Web selection explains, Naprosyn is a type of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug -- not a narcotic. Naprosyn, as this article explains, works to treat pain and inflammation by blocking certain hormones in the body.
  • Is Relafen a Narcotic?
    As this eMedTV Web selection explains, Relafen is a type of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), rather than a narcotic. Relafen, as this article discusses, works to treat arthritis symptoms by blocking certain hormones in the body.
  • Is There Assistance for Fibromyalgia Medications?
    You may be able to find an assistance program that helps you afford your fibromyalgia medications. This eMedTV article explains that certain criteria may apply and lists other possible sources of support, including your healthcare provider.
  • Is Toradol a Narcotic?
    As this eMedTV selection explains, Toradol is a type of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), rather than a narcotic. Toradol, as this article explains, works to treat moderate-to-severe pain by blocking certain hormones in the body.
  • Is Tramadol a Narcotic?
    As this eMedTV segment explains, tramadol (Ultram) was once not considered a narcotic, but that has recently changed. This Web page explains why and offers more information on what makes a drug a narcotic.
  • Is Vicodin or Darvocet Stronger?
    Which is stronger, Vicodin or Darvocet? As this eMedTV article explains, Vicodin is generally a stronger painkiller, compared to Darvocet. This article outlines some of the primary differences and similarities between the two pain medications.
  • It's Not My Fault If You Fail to Watch Your Dates
    Don't wait until you're just about to run out of your pain medication before initiating the process of getting a new prescription. Most doctors have a clear timeline and procedure for getting new prescriptions and are very, very hesitant to rush the process. If I have the time, I may be able to call or fax your doctor to help explain your situation, but if you yell at me and blame me for your forgetfulness, I may not feel inclined to do so. If you are not good at planning ahead, ask your pharmacist for ways to help you remember.
  • Keep an Open Mind
    Please don't refuse the possibility of trying anything but your favorite narcotic to control your pain. Doing so will increase my suspicions, and you might miss out on a beneficial change in your pain medication regimen. Showing me (and your doctor) that you are willing to try a non-narcotic option when appropriate shows me that controlling pain, not obtaining narcotics, is your top priority.
  • Ketamin
    As this eMedTV article explains, ketamine is an anesthetic used before certain medical procedures. This page discusses how this drug is administered and lists the factors that may affect your dose. Ketamin is a common misspelling of ketamine.
  • Ketamine
    Ketamine is a prescription anesthetic used before certain medical procedures. This page from the eMedTV Web site takes a detailed look at this anesthetic, including how it works, its various effects on the body, dosing, potential side effects, and more.
  • Ketamine Abuse
    If you abuse ketamine, it may result in extremely dangerous complications. This page of the eMedTV Web site explains how this drug has a potential for abuse, including some of the problems it may cause. A link to more details is also included.
  • Ketamine and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV page explains, it is unknown if ketamine (Ketalar) passes through breast milk. This page further explores breastfeeding and ketamine use, including why most women may want to wait at least 11 hours after receiving this drug to breastfeed.
  • Ketamine and Depression
    Using ketamine for depression treatment is an example of an "off-label," or unapproved, use for the drug. This eMedTV page explains when a doctor may prescribe this anesthetic drug for treating major depression. A link to more details is also included.
  • Ketamine and Pregnancy
    It is generally considered safe for pregnant women to use ketamine (Ketalar). This eMedTV Web selection takes a closer look at the research that has been done on using ketamine during pregnancy, including a list of potential problems that might occur.
  • Ketamine and Seizures
    If you are receiving the anesthetic drug ketamine, seizure-like side effects are possible. This eMedTV Web segment explains why you should contact your doctor right away if you experience any abnormal movements that resemble seizures.
  • Ketamine Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, your dose of ketamine will depend on how you respond to the drug, your weight, and various other factors. This article provides general dosing guidelines for this anesthetic medicine and explains how long the effects last.
  • Ketamine Drug Information
    This eMedTV page offers important information on ketamine, a drug prescribed for inducing anesthesia before certain medical procedures. This article also explains why this anesthetic is not suitable for everyone and describes possible side effects.
  • Ketamine Effects
    Negative effects of ketamine can include a rapid heartbeat, mood changes, and vision problems. This eMedTV Web selection describes other possible problems caused by this anesthetic, including serious side effects that require medical care.
  • Ketamine for Chronic Pain
    If you have certain types of pain, your doctor may recommend ketamine. This eMedTV Web selection explains how the use of ketamine for chronic pain, cancer pain, and postoperative pain is considered an "off-label," or unapproved, use of this drug.
  • Ketamine HCL
    As this eMedTV page discusses, ketamine HCl is a type of anesthesia medication used during certain surgical or medical procedures. This page explains how this anesthetic is administered and possible side effects. A link to more details is also included.
  • Ketamine Infusion
    This eMedTV page explains that when undergoing anesthesia with ketamine, the infusion is administered slowly and continuously into either a vein or a muscle. This page covers general dosing guidelines for this drug and links to more detailed information.
  • Ketamine Mechanism of Action
    By affecting certain brain pathways, ketamine can provide pain relief and anesthetic effects. This eMedTV page further explores ketamine's mechanism of action and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Ketamine Overdose
    This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at the possible complications that may occur when someone overdoses on ketamine (Ketalar). This article explains how some of these problems may even be fatal and discusses possible treatment options.
  • Ketamine Side Effects
    If you receive ketamine, side effects can occur and may include nausea, confusion, and double vision. This eMedTV resource lists some of the possible reactions to this anesthetic, including potentially serious problems that require medical attention.
  • Ketemine
    Ketamine is an anesthetic administered into a vein or a muscle. This eMedTV segment explains why this anesthetic may not be suitable for everyone and offers a link to more detailed information. Ketemine is a common misspelling of ketamine.
  • Ketomine
    As an anesthetic, ketamine can be used to induce anesthesia in combination with other anesthetics. This eMedTV resource gives more information on using ketamine and describes possible side effects. Ketomine is a common misspelling of ketamine.
  • Ketoprofen
    Ketoprofen is a drug commonly used to treat arthritis symptoms and general pain. This portion of the eMedTV archives covers this medication in detail, including information about how it works, approved uses, and potential side effects.
  • Ketoprofen and Pregnancy
    Most doctors do not recommend ketoprofen for pregnant women because it may affect the fetus. This eMedTV article discusses ketoprofen and pregnancy, and stresses the importance of not taking the medication at all during the third trimester.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2014 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.