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Drug Interactions With Anaprox - Embeda

This page contains links to eMedTV Pain Articles containing information on subjects from Drug Interactions With Anaprox to Embeda. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Drug Interactions With Anaprox
    Among the drugs that Anaprox can potentially interact with are beta blockers, ACE inhibitors, and warfarin. This eMedTV Web page describes how drug interactions with Anaprox can increase your risk of bleeding and stomach ulcers, among other things.
  • Drug Interactions With Buprenorphine
    When taking buprenorphine, be aware that it can interact with diazepam, alcohol, and other drugs. This eMedTV selection offers more details on drug interactions with this product, including a detailed list of medications that can cause problems.
  • Drug Interactions With Carisoprodol
    Alcohol, narcotics, and certain antibiotics can cause drug interactions with carisoprodol. As this eMedTV Web page explains, carisoprodol interactions may increase your risk of side effects or possibly affect the effectiveness of the medication.
  • Drug Interactions With Celecoxib
    This eMedTV Web page explains the drug interactions with celecoxib that can occur when the medication is taken with other drugs, such as aspirin, warfarin, or furosemide. Measures your healthcare provider may take to prevent these are also described.
  • Drug Interactions With Children's Acetaminophen
    Over-the-counter cough, cold, or allergy products may cause drug interactions with children's acetaminophen. This eMedTV segment lists other medicines that may interact with children's acetaminophen and describes the possible effects.
  • Drug Interactions With Cyclobenzaprine
    Narcotics, sleep medications, and alcohol may cause negative drug interactions with cyclobenzaprine. This eMedTV resource explains what can happen when these medications are combined and lists other medications that may also cause interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Cyclobenzaprine ER
    Tramadol, barbiturates, and alcohol can cause drug interactions with cyclobenzaprine ER. As this eMedTV page explains, combining certain medicines with cyclobenzaprine ER can increase your risk of side effects (including potentially dangerous ones).
  • Drug Interactions With Diclofenac Potassium
    This eMedTV page describes how drug interactions with diclofenac potassium can raise the risk of bleeding or kidney damage, among other things. Diuretics, aspirin, and lithium are among the drugs that can potentially interact with diclofenac potassium.
  • Drug Interactions With Diclofenac Sodium
    Diclofenac sodium can potentially interfere with many other drugs, including ACE inhibitors and diuretics. This eMedTV Web page explains how diclofenac sodium drug interactions can sometimes change the way your body metabolizes the drugs.
  • Drug Interactions With Diclofenac/Misoprostol
    This eMedTV page offers a detailed list of some of the drugs that can cause interactions with diclofenac/misoprostol and describes the potentially serious problems that can occur. This article also discusses ways to minimize your risk for these reactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Diflunisal
    Diuretics, antacids, and corticosteroids are among the drugs that can potentially interact with diflunisal. This eMedTV page explains how drug interactions with diflunisal can increase your risk of liver damage and stomach ulcers, among other things.
  • Drug Interactions With Etodolac Extended-Release
    This eMedTV segment provides a list of medicines that may cause drug interactions with etodolac extended-release, including methotrexate, aspirin, and lithium. These interactions may cause side effects such as kidney damage or stomach ulcers.
  • Drug Interactions With Fentanyl
    This eMedTV article explains that when certain medicines, such as sleep medicines, narcotics, or amphetamines, are taken with fentanyl, drug interactions can occur. This page also takes an in-depth look at the problems these interactions can cause.
  • Drug Interactions With Fentanyl Buccal Tablets
    This eMedTV article explains that when certain medicines, such as MAOIs, antihistamines, or beta blockers, are taken with fentanyl buccal tablets, drug interactions can occur. This page also describes the problems these interactions can cause.
  • Drug Interactions With Ketamine
    This eMedTV Web selection offers an extensive list of the drugs that can cause negative interactions with ketamine, including narcotic pain relievers, barbiturates, and peginterferon. This page explains the problems that can occur and how to avoid them.
  • Drug Interactions With Leflunomide
    This eMedTV segment provides an extensive list of the drugs that can cause negative interactions with leflunomide, including NSAIDs, warfarin, and vaccinations. This article explains the problems that can occur and talks about how they may be avoided.
  • Drug Interactions With Mefenamic Acid
    This eMedTV page offers a list of medicines that may potentially cause drug interactions with mefenamic acid, including antacids, aspirin, and warfarin. These interactions may lead to increased drug levels in your blood and/or other side effects.
  • Drug Interactions With Meloxicam
    This eMedTV segment lists drugs that can potentially interact with meloxicam (such as diuretics and NSAIDs) and describes how drug interactions with meloxicam can increase the risk of bleeding or kidney damage (among other things) in some people.
  • Drug Interactions With Metaxalone
    Narcotics, sleep medications, and alcohol may cause negative drug interactions with metaxalone. This eMedTV resource explains what can happen when these medications are combined and lists other medications that may also interact with metaxalone.
  • Drug Interactions With Motrin
    Drugs that can potentially interact with Motrin include beta blockers, warfarin, and aspirin. This part of the eMedTV library lists other Motrin drug interactions and discusses the potential side effects that may occur with each interaction.
  • Drug Interactions With Naprosyn
    Beta blockers and aspirin are among the drugs that can potentially interact with Naprosyn. This eMedTV page describes how drug interactions with Naprosyn can change how your body metabolizes the drugs or raise the levels of some drugs in your body.
  • Drug Interactions With Oxaprozin
    This eMedTV resource contains a detailed list of medicines that may cause drug interactions with oxaprozin, such as lithium, glyburide, and warfarin. These interactions may cause serious side effects or decrease the effectiveness of the drugs.
  • Drug Interactions With Oxycodone/APAP
    To avoid serious problems, it is important to be aware of possible drug interactions with oxycodone/APAP. This eMedTV resource provides a list of medications that may negatively interact with oxycodone/APAP and describes the problems that may occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Pegloticase
    This eMedTV page lists a few medications that pegloticase might interact with, such as Neulasta, Somavert, and Doxil. This article lists other "PEGylated" medicines that may theoretically cause problems when combined with pegloticase.
  • Drug Interactions With Pentazocine
    Your doctor may recommend avoiding certain medications while you are receiving pentazocine treatment. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at various products that can cause pentazocine drug interactions. It also discusses how to reduce your risk.
  • Drug Interactions With Pregabalin
    Alcohol, sleep drugs, and barbiturates are among the drugs that can potentially interact with pregabalin. This eMedTV Web page describes how drug interactions with pregabalin can increase your risk of certain side effects (such as confusion).
  • Drug Interactions With Propoxyphene
    As this eMedTV Web article discusses, propoxyphene drug interactions can occur with several substances, including alcohol and most antidepressants. This resource outlines other products that may cause reactions and describes the problems that may occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Sumatriptan/Naproxen Sodium
    Diuretics, aspirin, and triptans may cause drug interactions with sumatriptan/naproxen sodium. This eMedTV article lists other products that may cause an interaction and describes the possible effects of a sumatriptan/naproxen sodium interaction.
  • Drug Interactions With Tapentadol ER
    Because tapentadol ER drug interactions can cause serious problems, this eMedTV resource provides details on how to reduce your risk. This includes a list of products that may react negatively, as well as a description of the problems that can occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Tramadol/Acetaminophen
    Sleep medications, alcohol, and antipsychotics may interact with tramadol/acetaminophen. As this eMedTV article explains, drug interactions with tramadol/acetaminophen can cause serotonin syndrome or increase your risk for side effects.
  • Duragesic
    Duragesic is a prescription skin patch approved to treat moderate-to-severe pain. This page of the eMedTV Web site gives an in-depth overview of this medication, describing how it works and offering information on how to use the skin patch properly.
  • Duragesic 25 Mcg
    As this eMedTV page explains, a doctor may prescribe a Duragesic 25 mcg/hour skin patch to treat moderate-to-severe pain. This page offers some general dosing guidelines, including factors that may affect your amount and tips on using this drug.
  • Duragesic Abuse
    This eMedTV Web resource explains that because Duragesic (fentanyl patch) is a narcotic pain medication, it is often abused. This page also covers some of the possible consequences of Duragesic abuse, such as breathing problems and even death.
  • Duragesic and Breastfeeding
    Duragesic (fentanyl patch) passes through breast milk and could cause problems in a nursing infant. This eMedTV page lists several problems that may occur in infants whose mothers use Duragesic while breastfeeding, such as breathing problems.
  • Duragesic and Pregnancy
    The full risks of using Duragesic (fentanyl patch) during pregnancy are not known at this time. This eMedTV article talks about using this product during pregnancy, and explains what problems occurred when this drug was given to pregnant animals.
  • Duragesic Dosage
    Before prescribing Duragesic, your healthcare provider will take into account several factors. This eMedTV page describes these factors and offers some general Duragesic dosing guidelines. A list of important tips for using this patch is also included.
  • Duragesic Drug Interactions
    Alcohol, grapefruit, and certain diuretics may cause drug interactions with Duragesic. This eMedTV page lists other products that may cause negative reactions with the skin patch and describes the problems that may occur if these substances are combined.
  • Duragesic Medication Information
    Duragesic is a prescription drug used to treat chronic pain. This portion of the eMedTV Web site offers more information on Duragesic, explaining the medication's dosing guidelines, possible side effects, general safety precautions, and more.
  • Duragesic Overdose
    An overdose with Duragesic (fentanyl patch) could lead to seizures, breathing problems, or even death. This eMedTV Web selection outlines other possible overdose effects and explains how a healthcare provider may treat the symptoms that occur.
  • Duragesic Pain Patch
    When treating moderate-to-severe pain, Duragesic patches provide continuous, around-the-clock pain relief. This eMedTV segment further explores these medicated skin patches, including who can use them and possible side effects that may occur.
  • Duragesic Patch
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Duragesic to treat moderate-to-severe pain. This eMedTV Web resource takes a closer look at this pain reliever, including how to use Duragesic patches, possible side effects, and some safety precautions.
  • Duragesic Patch Doseage
    As this eMedTV article explains, your Duragesic patch dosage will depend on the type and severity of your pain, among other factors. This page offers tips on how to use this patch. Duragesic patch doseage is a common misspelling of Duragesic patch dosage.
  • Duragesic Side Effects
    Common side effects of Duragesic include constipation, nausea, and vomiting. This eMedTV resource provides a more complete list of side effects and also explains which reactions to the skin patch are potentially serious and require medical attention.
  • Duragesic Uses
    Duragesic is a pain medicine prescribed for treating moderate-to-severe chronic pain. This eMedTV page discusses specific uses of Duragesic, including whether this narcotic is safe for children. A description of how this drug works is also provided.
  • Duragesic Warnings and Precautions
    If you have asthma, let your doctor know before you use Duragesic. This eMedTV page lists other conditions you should tell your doctor about before using the patch. Warnings and precautions on who should not use Duragesic are also listed in this article.
  • Duragesic Withdrawal
    Stopping Duragesic (fentanyl patch) too quickly can cause withdrawal symptoms. This page of the eMedTV Web site provides a detailed list of possible withdrawal symptoms and explains how your healthcare provider can help you avoid them.
  • Durgesic
    Duragesic is a medicine licensed for the relief of moderate-to-severe chronic pain. This eMedTV segment offers a brief overview of the medicated skin patch and includes a link to more detailed information. Durgesic is a common misspelling of Duragesic.
  • Durigesic
    As this eMedTV page explains, Duragesic is a prescription drug used to treat long-term pain. This article takes a brief look at using this mediated skin patch for treating moderate-to-severe pain. Durigesic is a common misspelling of Duragesic.
  • Eat Your Spinach
    Some research has shown that increasing foods high in magnesium may help boost energy and alleviate pain caused by fibromyalgia. Green vegetables like spinach are a good source of magnesium.
  • EC-Naprosyn
    EC-Naprosyn is a medication commonly used to treat symptoms of arthritis. This portion of the eMedTV archives offers an in-depth look at the uses for this medicine, how it works, effects, dosing guidelines, side effects, and more.
  • Effects of Darvocet
    Darvocet contains a narcotic pain reliever that works in the central nervous system. This part of the eMedTV Web site explains what this medication is specifically used for and describes the other beneficial effects of Darvocet.
  • Effects of Darvon
    By working in the brain and spinal cord, Darvon can help relieve pain. This eMedTV Web resource talks about Darvon's effects in the body, explaining how it works and why it is a commonly abused drug. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Effects of Fibromyalgia
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, fibromyalgia is a condition that can affect many parts of the body. This article takes a closer look at fibromyalgia and its effects, including typical symptoms that may appear in someone with the condition.
  • Effects of Lortab
    As this eMedTV page discusses, Lortab is a prescribed drug used to treat moderate to moderately severe pain in adults and children as young as two years old. This page discusses the effects of Lortab, including how it works and its potential for abuse.
  • Effects of Norco
    Because it contains hydrocodone and acetaminophen, Norco can help relieve pain. This eMedTV Web resource talks about Norco's effects in the body, explaining how it works and providing a link to more detailed information on this drug.
  • Effects of OxyContin
    OxyContin is a narcotic drug that produces many different effects, including pain relief. This eMedTV Web page lists some of OxyContin's other effects, explains how the medicine works, and discusses possible off-label uses for this drug.
  • Effects of Percocet
    Percocet can be used to relieve short-term pain due to a surgery, dental procedure, or injury. This eMedTV Web page discusses the effects of Percocet in more detail and describes how this medication works to treat moderate to moderately severe pain.
  • Effects of Tramadol
    As this eMedTV article explains, tramadol is a prescription medication used to treat moderate to moderately severe pain. This page takes a closer look at the effects of this drug, including information on how it works and its potential for abuse.
  • Effects of Vicodin
    As this eMedTV article discusses, Vicodin is a prescription medication used to treat moderate to moderately severe pain in adults. This page takes a closer look at the effects of Vicodin, including details on how it works and its potential for abuse.
  • Electrical Stimulation
    A number of different therapies use electricity to treat pain. It is thought that electrical impulses can interrupt signals of pain to the brain. Without those messages reaching the brain, the sensation of pain goes away. Electrical stimulation therapies include transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), peripheral nerve stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, and deep brain or intracerebral stimulation. Each method targets different points in the series of pain messages to your brain, and one method may be preferred over another, depending on the type and location of pain being treated.
  • Embeda
    Embeda is a prescription pain medication specially designed to help prevent abuse. This eMedTV Web page offers an in-depth look at the drug, including information on its effects, possible side effects, dosing information, general precautions, and more.
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