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What Is Percocet Used For? - Zipsor Warnings and Precautions

This page contains links to eMedTV Pain Articles containing information on subjects from What Is Percocet Used For? to Zipsor Warnings and Precautions. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • What Is Percocet Used For?
    As this selection from the eMedTV archives explains, Percocet is a drug that treats moderate to moderately severe pain. This article talks more about what the medication is used for and offers a link to more Percocet information.
  • What Is Pregabalin Used For?
    Pregabalin is used for the treatment of epilepsy, diabetic peripheral neuropathy, and other conditions. This eMedTV segment discusses these and other pregabalin uses, including "off-label" uses of the drug (such as treating anxiety).
  • What Is Suboxone?
    Suboxone is a medication prescribed to treat opioid dependence. This page from the eMedTV Web site provides details on what Suboxone is prescribed for, how it works, and possible side effects. A link to more information is also included.
  • What Is Subutex Used For?
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Subutex is used for treating opioid dependence. This page takes a closer look at uses of this medication, including possible off-label, or unapproved, uses. A link to more information on this topic is also included.
  • What Is Subutex?
    A doctor may prescribe Subutex to treat opioid dependence. This page of the eMedTV Web site offers a brief description of what Subutex is prescribed for, including uses and details on how the drug works. A link to more information is also included.
  • What Is Sumatriptan/Naproxen Sodium Used For?
    Sumatriptan/naproxen sodium is used for relieving the symptoms of a migraine headache. This eMedTV resource further describes the effects of this medication and explains whether there are any approved sumatriptan/naproxen sodium uses for children.
  • What Is Talacen Prescribed For?
    As this eMedTV page explains, Talacen is prescribed for treating mild-to-moderate pain. This article page takes a closer look at Talacen, including information on how to take it and why it may not be suitable for everyone. It also links to more details.
  • What Is Tapentadol ER Used For?
    If you have chronic pain, your healthcare provider may prescribe tapentadol ER. This eMedTV resource further explores what tapentadol ER is used for, whether it is safe for children, and how it works to relieve pain in adults.
  • What Is the Normal Dose for Subutex?
    When taking Subutex, the normal dose typically ranges between 4 mg and 24 mg each day. This eMedTV page discusses dosing guidelines for this drug in more detail and offers a link to more information on how a doctor will determine the right amount for you.
  • What Is Tramadol Used For?
    If you have moderate to moderately severe pain, your doctor may prescribe tramadol. This page of the eMedTV Web library further discusses what tramadol is used for, whether it is safe for children, and how it works to relieve pain in adults.
  • What Is Tramadol/Acetaminophen Used For?
    Tramadol/acetaminophen is used short-term pain relief. This section of the eMedTV Web site discusses tramadol/acetaminophen uses in more detail, including information on the use of the medicine in children and possible off-label uses.
  • What Is Tramadol?
    Tramadol is approved for the treatment of moderate to moderately severe pain. This eMedTV resource further explains what tramadol is, with information on how the drug works, its potential for abuse, and links to in-depth articles on specific topics.
  • What Is Voltaren-XR Used For?
    What is Voltaren-XR used for? This page of the eMedTV Web site lists common uses for the drug, such as the relief of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis symptoms, as well as off-label uses, like treating symptoms of ankylosing spondylitis.
  • What Medications Are Used to Treat Chronic Pain?
    As this eMedTV page explains, several different medications are available to treat chronic pain. This segment lists them by category, provides examples of such drugs, and explains when one type of drug might be considered over another.
  • What to Expect Without a Laparoscopy for Chronic Pelvic Pain
    It is impossible to predict what to expect without a laparoscopy for chronic pelvic pain. This segment of the eMedTV library discusses alternatives to the surgery and what may happen if you choose not to have this procedure.
  • What You Can Expect Without a Laparoscopy for Endometriosis
    As this eMedTV article explains, if you are pursuing alternative treatment, you may be wondering what you can expect without a laparoscopy for endometriosis. Your symptoms may improve, stay the same, or get worse without the procedure.
  • When to Take Lortab
    This eMedTV segment takes a look at when Lortab should be taken. As this page discusses, Lortab is typically taken every four to six hours as needed for pain relief. This page also describes other tips for when and how to use this medication.
  • When to Take Norco
    This eMedTV resource explains that your healthcare provider will tell you when to take Norco. It will be prescribed on either a scheduled or an as-needed basis, based on various factors. A link to more information on Norco dosing is also included.
  • When to Take Percocet
    Most people take Percocet on an "as needed" basis, meaning you only take it when you experience pain. This eMedTV page provides more information on when to take Percocet and offers important precautions for using this particular medication.
  • When to Take Tramadol
    This eMedTV segment takes a look at when to take tramadol. As this page explains, the drug is typically taken every four to six hours as needed for pain relief. A few tips for when and how to take tramadol are provided, with a link to more information.
  • When to Take Vicodin
    This eMedTV segment takes a look at when Vicodin should be taken. As this page discusses, Vicodin is typically taken every four to six hours as needed for pain relief. This page also gives other tips for when and how to effectively take this medication.
  • Who Does Fibromyalgia Affect?
    This video clip explains who fibromyalgia affects, as well as risk factors for the condition.
  • Who Makes Darvon?
    As this eMedTV article explains, Xanodyne Pharmaceuticals is the company that makes brand-name Darvon. This page also offers a listing of manufacturers who make generic Darvon and includes a link to more information on this pain medication.
  • Who Makes Meloxicam?
    Breckenridge pharmaceuticals and Roxane Laboratories are two of the companies that make meloxicam. This eMedTV article offers a listing of manufacturers who make brand-name and generic forms of meloxicam, and includes links to more in-depth information.
  • Who Makes Motrin?
    Teva Pharmaceuticals and Par Pharmaceutical are two of the companies that make Motrin. This eMedTV article offers a listing of manufacturers who make brand-name and generic forms of Motrin, and includes a link to more in-depth information.
  • Who Makes Naprosyn?
    Roche Pharmaceuticals and Roxane Laboratories are among the companies who make Naprosyn. This page from the eMedTV Web library provides a list of several manufacturers who make the brand-name and generic versions of this medication.
  • Who Makes Relafen?
    Sandoz and GlaxoSmithKline are some of the companies that make Relafen. This eMedTV Web resource provides a listing of manufacturers who make brand-name and generic forms of Relafen, and includes a link to more in-depth information.
  • Who Makes Toradol?
    Roche Pharmaceuticals and Mylan Laboratories are some of the companies that make Toradol. This eMedTV article offers a listing of manufacturers who make brand-name and generic forms of Toradol, and includes links to more in-depth information.
  • Withdrawal Effects of OxyContin
    Withdrawal from OxyContin can lead to symptoms such as diarrhea, muscle pain, and vomiting. This page from the eMedTV Web site explores other possible effects of OxyContin withdrawal and offers information on why these symptoms occur.
  • Xodol
    Short-term pain associated with an injury or surgery is often treated with Xodol, a combination medication. This eMedTV resource provides a detailed overview of this drug, including how it works, dosing guidelines, safety precautions, and more.
  • Xodol and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV article takes a look at Xodol and breastfeeding. It explores the possible risks associated with this combination and stresses the importance of talking to your healthcare provider before taking Xodol while breastfeeding.
  • Xodol and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV resource discusses the risks associated with taking Xodol during pregnancy. It explores the results of animal studies on the topic and also describes how the FDA rates the safety of drugs during pregnancy.
  • Xodol Dosage
    You may be instructed to take your Xodol dosage as needed for pain or every four to six hours. This eMedTV Web page describes the various factors that affect the dose a person is prescribed and also offers tips on taking the medication safely.
  • Xodol Drug Information
    Xodol is approved to treat pain in adults. This eMedTV page offers more drug information on Xodol, with details on what to expect during treatment and the types of pain it can treat. A link to more details is also included.
  • Xodol Drug Interactions
    This page of the eMedTV archives lists several medications that interact negatively with Xodol, such as alcohol and benzodiazepines. The potentially serious consequences of these Xodol drug interactions are also described, as are ways to avoid them.
  • Xodol Overdose
    A Xodol overdose is serious, with potentially fatal consequences; therefore, rapid treatment is essential. This eMedTV Web article lists several common effects of a Xodol overdose and describes the available treatment options.
  • Xodol Side Effects
    While most Xodol side effects are minor, some are serious and may require prompt medical attention. This eMedTV article discusses both common and serious side effects of Xodol, explaining which ones should be reported to a healthcare provider.
  • Xodol Uses
    Managing short-term, moderate pain is one of the primary uses for Xodol. As this eMedTV resource explains, it also is used on occasion to treat chronic pain. This article explores off-label Xodol uses and whether the drug is used in children.
  • Xodol Warnings and Precautions
    Because not everyone can take Xodol, warnings and precautions for the drug are provided in this eMedTV article. This includes a list of people who should not take the medication and conditions to tell your doctor about before beginning treatment.
  • You'll Be Hazy
    We've all seen it on TV or in the movies: people taking so much powerful pain medication that they merely exist in a hazy cloud, too mentally foggy to function in society. This is the last thing most people want, and it's one of the more common reasons for resisting pain medications. It's true that many pain medications cause sedation (particularly narcotics), especially before a person becomes accustomed to such effects. However, living in pain also creates a mental fog (often an irritable one, as well), and the fog of medication might just be clearer than the fog of pain. And don't forget that many different non-narcotic pain medications are now available and might just help manage your pain without clouding your brain.
  • You'll Be Seen as a Wimp
    This fear is probably more common among men, who often feel like they should "be a man" and live with the pain. You may be afraid that accepting pain medications will be viewed as a sign of weakness. However, smart pain management is just that -- smart. It will help you function and be productive.
  • You'll Become Addicted
    The fear of addiction is a very common reason why people avoid pain medication. It is important to keep in mind, however, that while some pain meds (particularly opioids) carry the risk for addiction and abuse, people who do not already have risk factors for addiction and who use the medicines as prescribed rarely become addicted to them. If you can't shake this fear, though, or if you have risk factors for addiction and abuse (such as previous alcohol or drug problems or close relatives with similar problems), rest assured that many non-narcotic pain medications are available.
  • You'll Fail Your Drug Test
    There are a number of different reasons why people must undergo drug testing. For instance, some jobs require testing. Some insurance policies require testing. Whatever the reason, people who must undergo drug screening often avoid using pain medications to avoid failing the tests. Be sure you understand the details, though. In some situations, as long as you have a valid prescription, it should be okay. However, some medications are prohibited for certain jobs for safety reasons, so make sure you know the requirements. In such situations, non-narcotics are usually the answer.
  • You'll Overdo It
    Some people fear that pain medications will completely eliminate pain, allowing them to perform tasks that will cause further damage or injury. However, this is typically not the case. Instead of eliminating pain, a good pain regimen will help a person manage it. This can allow a person to stay active and participate in physical therapy, both of which can help reduce chronic pain and help prevent future injury and damage.
  • Your Mom Just Called Me...
    She was begging that I not fill your narcotics prescription. Or maybe it was your sister, your child, or your spouse. She was crying and made me promise not to tell you that she called. She thinks you have a problem with narcotics addiction. This situation is actually surprisingly common. You may not even have an addiction problem at all (as you probably know, friends and relatives sometimes develop unfounded suspicions). But if I'm stalling or seem to be prying more than usual, this may be the reason. I can't tell you she called because I promised I wouldn't, but I can't tell her anything reassuring, either because all your information is confidential.
  • Zipsor
    Zipsor is a medication often prescribed for the treatment of mild to moderate acute pain. This page from the eMedTV Web site describes how the drug works, explains when and how to take it, and lists potential side effects of the medicine.
  • Zipsor and Breastfeeding
    It is not known whether Zipsor (diclofenac potassium) passes through breast milk in humans. This eMedTV resource offers a more in-depth look at breastfeeding and Zipsor, and describes the potential problems you should look for in your nursing child.
  • Zipsor and Pregnancy
    The full risks of using Zipsor (diclofenac potassium) are unknown for women who are expecting. This eMedTV segment offers more information on pregnancy and Zipsor, and explains what happened when other pain medications were given to pregnant women.
  • Zipsor Dosage
    There is only one standard recommended dosage of Zipsor, regardless of your age or weight. As this eMedTV Web page explains, the recommended dose for treating mild to moderate short-term pain is 25 mg four times a day.
  • Zipsor Drug Interactions
    Lithium, methotrexate, and various other medications may cause drug interactions with Zipsor. This eMedTV resource lists other medicines that may interfere with Zipsor and describes the potential effects of these negative interactions.
  • Zipsor Medication Information
    Zipsor is a pain medicine approved to treat mild to moderate, short-term pain. This eMedTV Web page provides more information about the prescription medication Zipsor, including general guidelines on when and how to take the drug.
  • Zipsor Overdose
    Taking too much Zipsor (diclofenac potassium) may lead to irregular breathing, ulcers, or kidney failure. This eMedTV article lists other possible overdose symptoms and describes various options that are available to treat an overdose with this drug.
  • Zipsor Side Effects
    Common side effects of Zipsor include vomiting, dizziness, and constipation. This eMedTV page lists other common side effects and also describes some of the potentially serious problems with this medicine that may require medical attention.
  • Zipsor Uses
    Zipsor is licensed to treat mild to moderate pain in adults. This article from the eMedTV archives discusses the uses of Zipsor in more detail (including possible off-label uses) and explains how the medication works to reduce pain and inflammation.
  • Zipsor Warnings and Precautions
    You should not take Zipsor if you are allergic to aspirin. This eMedTV segment offers more warnings and precautions on Zipsor. Side effects or complications that may occur with this drug are also listed on this page.
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