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Generic Vistaril - Indocin Drug Interactions

This page contains links to eMedTV Pain Articles containing information on subjects from Generic Vistaril to Indocin Drug Interactions. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Generic Vistaril
    There are many generic Vistaril products available, including capsules and injectable forms. This page from the eMedTV Web archives describes these various generic versions in more detail and explains which products are not available in generic form.
  • Generic Xodol
    This page on the eMedTV Web site explains why generic Xodol is currently unavailable. It explains the manufacturing history for the drug and also explores whether a generic version may become available in the near future.
  • Generic Zipsor
    At this time, Zipsor (diclofenac potassium) is not available in generic form. This Web page from the eMedTV site explains why there are no generic Zipsor products available on the market and offers information on when these products may be available.
  • Get Moving
    Although exercise may be the last thing you want to do when the pain of fibromyalgia strikes, a regular regimen of physical activity can improve your overall well-being, thereby helping to treat fibromyalgia. Choose something you enjoy so you can stick with it. Don't jump into something too strenuous, too soon, or you'll merely add to your current pain. Start with something gentle if you are out of shape. Before you know it, you'll be enjoying the benefits of increased strength, flexibility, and stamina. Some insurance programs or "healthy workplace" programs may help provide discounts for gym memberships.
  • Glucosamine Hydrochloride
    Glucosamine hydrochloride is a dietary supplement most often used to treat arthritis. This eMedTV article describes the various effects of glucosamine hydrochloride, explains whether it is effective, and lists potential side effects of the supplement.
  • Guided Imagery
    Guided imagery involves relaxation, deep breathing, and focus to remove attention from pain. It is an effective technique and is often done with a professional helping guide your focus. Once learned, it can be done as an independent exercise. Common techniques involve focusing on another part of the body without pain, imagining the pain melting away, or using positive imagery to distract from painful sensations. This technique can be used for many different types of pain, and once learned, can be an easy, safe, and effective way to help cope with a number of situations.
  • Headaches
    Headaches are a common type of pain, and nearly everyone has experienced a headache at some point. Headaches can be brought on by a number of things, including stress, illness, not drinking enough water, or not getting enough sleep. Often, they can be treated through a combination of lifestyle changes and over-the-counter or prescription pain relievers. Headaches can also be a sign of more serious problems, so don't hesitate to seek medical attention if a headache is particularly severe or is accompanied by other symptoms like changes in vision, fever, neck stiffness, confusion, fainting, or other abnormal symptoms.
  • How Are Stress and Fibromyalgia Related?
    This page of the eMedTV archives explains that although there is a clear link between stress and fibromyalgia symptoms, physical and chemical reactions in the body may also play a role. In addition, reducing stress may not always provide relief.
  • How Do Duragesic Patches Work?
    This eMedTV page discusses how Duragesic patches work to provide continuous relief of moderate-to-severe chronic pain. This article also explains who might benefit from this strong opioid narcotic medicine. A link to more details is also included.
  • How Do I Explain about Fibromyalgia?
    People with fibromyalgia may find it frustrating when friends and family members dismiss the condition. This eMedTV selection offers ways to help other people better understand this disease and what to do if they still don't offer support.
  • How Does Darvocet Work?
    Many people wonder, "How does Darvocet work?" As this eMedTV page explains, Darvocet contains a narcotic that works in the central nervous system, and a pain reliever/fever reducer commonly found in over-the-counter medicines.
  • How Does Darvon Work?
    If you are taking Darvon for pain relief, you may be curious about how it works. This selection from the eMedTV archives gives a brief explanation of how this prescription medicine is thought to relieve pain and provides a link to more information.
  • How Does Lortab Work?
    As this eMedTV page explains, Lortab contains two different pain medications that can effectively treat moderate to moderately severe pain. This page further discusses how the drug works, including detailed information on Lortab's effects in the body.
  • How Does Meloxicam Work?
    If you are taking meloxicam for arthritis symptoms, you may be curious about how it works. Meloxicam, as this eMedTV page explains, works by blocking certain hormones in the body that cause pain and swelling. This page also links to more information.
  • How Does Motrin Work?
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Motrin works to relieve pain by blocking the action of certain hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body. This page further discusses how the drug works, including Motrin's effects in the body.
  • How Does Naprosyn Work?
    As this eMedTV article explains, Naprosyn works to relieve pain and other symptoms by blocking the action of certain hormones that cause inflammation and pain. This page further discusses how the drug works, including Naprosyn's effects in the body.
  • How Does Norco Work?
    If you are taking Norco for pain relief, you may be curious about how it works. This selection from the eMedTV archives gives a brief explanation of how the drug may relieve pain and provides a link to more information on this medication.
  • How Does OxyContin Work?
    OxyContin is a powerful pain reliever, but how does it work? As this eMedTV page explains, OxyContin binds to opioid receptors throughout the body to produce several different effects (such as pain relief, cough suppression, and decreased breathing).
  • How Does Percocet Work?
    This segment from the eMedTV archives addresses the question, "How does Percocet work?" As this article explains, the medicine combines oxycodone and acetaminophen to make it more effective at decreasing pain and relieving coughing.
  • How Does Relafen Work?
    If you are taking Relafen for arthritis symptoms, you may be curious about how it works. This selection from the eMedTV archives gives a brief explanation of how the drug relieves pain, swelling, and stiffness. A link to more information is also included.
  • How Does Toradol Work?
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Toradol works to relieve pain by blocking the action of certain hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body. This page further discusses how the drug works, including Toradol's effects in the body.
  • How Does Tramadol Work?
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, tramadol is used to relieve pain by affecting the central nervous system and specific brain chemicals. This page provides an overview of how tramadol works, with detailed information on its effects in the body.
  • How Does Vicodin Work?
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, Vicodin contains two different pain medications that can effectively treat moderate to moderately severe pain. This page further discusses how the drug works, including information on Vicodin's effects in the body.
  • How Long Does a Duragesic Patch Take to Work?
    It can take up to six days to feel the full pain-relieving effects of Duragesic. This eMedTV page offers more information on how long it takes for a Duragesic patch to work, with a link to more details on dosing with this medication.
  • How Long Does Demerol Stay in the Body?
    Demerol is known to show up in certain drug tests. As this eMedTV page explains, this causes many people to wonder, "How long does Demerol stay in the body?" This article explains what the elimination half life is for this narcotic pain medication.
  • How Long Does Demerol Stay in Your System?
    Many people may wonder, "How long does Demerol stay in your system?" As this eMedTV resource explains, with a half life of 2.5 to 4 hours, Demerol (meperidine) will be mostly out of your system in 10 to 20 hours (for most practical purposes).
  • How Long Does Suboxone Stay in Your System?
    It can take a week or longer for Suboxone to be mostly out of your system. This eMedTV article further explores how long Suboxone stays in your system, with details on why you only have to take this medicine once daily to treat opioid dependence.
  • How Strong Is Talacen?
    This selection from the eMedTV archives takes a look at how strong Talacen is compared to other opioid narcotic pain relievers. It also offers a link to an in-depth description of what the drug is used for and how it works.
  • How to Get High on Lortab?
    As this eMedTV page explains, if you are trying to use Lortab to get high, you may have an addiction to the drug. This page explains that abusing Lortab can lead to dangerous complications, such as breathing problems, liver damage, and even death.
  • How to Get High on Percocet
    Many people may be curious about how to get high on Percocet. As this eMedTV segment explains, using Percocet (a narcotic drug) for non-medical reasons can be very dangerous, as the drug can cause both physical and psychological dependence.
  • How to Get High on Vicodin?
    As this eMedTV page explains, if you are looking for ways to get high on Vicodin, you may have an addiction to the drug. This page explains that abusing Vicodin can lead to dangerous complications, such as breathing problems, liver damage, and even death.
  • How to Take Suboxone
    The tablet or film forms of Suboxone are dissolved under the tongue once daily. This eMedTV page offers more details on how to take Suboxone, including why this drug is less likely to be abused than other opioids. A link to more details is also included.
  • Hycet
    Hycet is a prescription pain medication licensed to treat moderate to moderately severe pain. This eMedTV resource explains how Hycet works and offers a more in-depth look at the drug's effects, dosing information, and potential side effects.
  • Hydrocodone/APAP
    Short-term moderate to moderately severe pain can often be treated with hydrocodone/APAP. This eMedTV segment provides an in-depth look at this prescription drug, including its effects, possible side effects, dosing information, and more.
  • Hydrocodone/APAP Abuse
    This page of the eMedTV archives takes an in-depth look at hydrocodone/APAP abuse. It explains why it can be hard to detect, describes people who may be more likely to abuse the drug, and discusses the dangers of hydrocodone/APAP abuse.
  • Hydrocodone/APAP and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV Web page takes a look at issues surrounding hydrocodone/APAP and breastfeeding. It explains manufacturers' recommendations, possible risks the drug presents to breastfeeding infants, and urges discussing the matter with your doctor.
  • Hydrocodone/APAP and Constipation
    Constipation is a commonly expected side effect of hydrocodone/APAP. This eMedTV resource offers more information on hydrocodone/APAP and constipation, including why it is likely to occur and treatment options your healthcare provider may recommend.
  • Hydrocodone/APAP and Pregnancy
    This segment of the eMedTV archives explores the risks surrounding hydrocodone/APAP and pregnancy. It describes the results of clinical studies on the topic and describes circumstances in which the drug could be taken during pregnancy.
  • Hydrocodone/APAP Dosage
    In most cases, a person's hydrocodone/APAP dosage is taken as needed for pain, although this can vary. This eMedTV resource describes hydrocodone/APAP dosing guidelines in detail, including important safety precautions you need to be aware of.
  • Hydrocodone/APAP Drug Interactions
    Because hydrocodone/APAP drug interactions can have such serious consequences, this eMedTV segment provides the information you need to avoid them. This includes a list of medicines that interact with hydrocodone/APAP, such as benzodiazepines.
  • Hydrocodone/APAP From Mexico
    This page of the eMedTV library describes what you need to know when considering buying hydrocodone/APAP from Mexico. While such an action is legal, this page explains why you may not be able to bring the drug with you to the United States.
  • Hydrocodone/APAP Medication Info
    This eMedTV selection takes a quick look at hydrocodone/APAP, a medication used to treat pain. This resource looks at the types of pain it can treat, the different forms available, and more. A link to more details is also included.
  • Hydrocodone/APAP Overdose
    Prompt treatment is essential for people who overdose on hydrocodone/APAP. This page of the eMedTV archives lists possible symptoms of a hydrocodone/APAP overdose and describes the various treatment options that are available.
  • Hydrocodone/APAP Side Effects
    While most people have no problems with hydrocodone/APAP, side effects are possible. This page on the eMedTV site lists some of the more common side effects of hydrocodone/APAP, as well as potentially serious ones that may need medical attention.
  • Hydrocodone/APAP Warnings and Precautions
    People with Addison's disease, BPH, or kidney disease may not be able to take hydrocodone/APAP. This eMedTV page contains additional hydrocodone/APAP warnings and precautions to be aware of before beginning treatment with the medication.
  • Hydrocodone/APAP Withdrawal
    Symptoms of hydrocodone/APAP withdrawal, as this eMedTV article explains, are not necessarily a sign of abuse, since the body becomes dependent on the drug even with legitimate use. This page lists possible symptoms and explains how to avoid them.
  • Hydrocodone/APAP Without a Prescription
    This eMedTV article describes the dangers associated with buying hydrocodone/APAP without a prescription. It explains the risks such an action can present (for example, some people should not take the drug) and how it may be a sign of addiction.
  • Hypnosis
    Hypnosis is another psychological therapy that focuses on the connection between mind and body. When most people think of hypnosis, they think of swinging silver watches and quacking like a duck on command, but there is growing evidence for hypnosis as a medical therapy. Through promotion of an altered mental state in which concentration, focus, and relaxation are heightened, outside distractions are "tuned out," leaving the mind open to suggestions that may help both relieve pain and promote positive reinforcement of pain-management techniques.
  • I Might Not Want Your Business
    Don't be offended; it's probably not because I find you suspicious or objectionable. But if I never seem to have your medication in stock, I might be subtly telling you that I don't want your business. Most likely, I won't make any money off the particular drug you're needing, and with all the red tape and liability surrounding narcotics, I may not be willing to absorb a loss on a narcotic. Perhaps I don't have any other patients on that particular medication, and I'm not willing to order an expensive 100-count bottle to fill your prescription for 30 tablets, especially if I think I'll never see you again. Don't take it personally, but do try asking your pharmacist for the "whole story," without getting offended or angry.
  • I Want What Is Best for You
    I don't want you to die from an accidental overdose. I don't want you to develop an addiction problem. But I also don't want you to have poorly controlled pain. I can be one of your most powerful allies in the fight against chronic pain, if you'll let me. As a pharmacist, I have a natural tendency to believe that medications are always the answer, and I'll work hard to find a medication or combination of medications that will work well for you. Please understand that I have your best interests at heart, and please don't assume I'm against you.
  • I'm Really Busy
    This is almost universally the case. If you have a special request or need to talk at length with a pharmacist, please respect his or her very busy schedule. Call ahead to see if a particular time would be best.
  • Incisional Hernia After a Laparoscopy for Endometriosis
    When the layer of tissue that holds your abdomen together doesn't heal after surgery, a hernia may develop. This eMedTV Web page gives information on treatment for an incisional hernia after a laparoscopy for endometriosis.
  • Indocin
    Indocin is a prescription drug that may be used to relieve pain, inflammation, fever, and swelling. This eMedTV article provides an overview of Indocin, featuring information about its uses, its strengths, and some of its potential side effects.
  • Indocin and Pregnancy
    In most cases, healthcare providers do not recommend Indocin for women during pregnancy. This eMedTV resource discusses Indocin and pregnancy, including a warning about taking the drug during the third trimester.
  • Indocin and Weight Gain
    Less than 1 percent of people taking Indocin in clinical studies reported gradual weight gain. This eMedTV page discusses Indocin and weight gain, and provides suggestions for dealing with gradual gains in weight, such as exercising more.
  • Indocin Dosage
    The Indocin dose recommended for treating arthritis symptoms is often 25 mg two or three times daily. This eMedTV segment also offers Indocin dosage guidelines for other conditions, such as acute shoulder pain and symptoms of gout.
  • Indocin Drug Interactions
    Indocin may interact with a number of medications, such as lithium, warfarin, and methotrexate. This eMedTV page describes potential Indocin drug interactions involving several different types of drugs, including beta blockers and ACE inhibitors.
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