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Clinoril and Weight Gain - Darvocet Medication for Pain

This page contains links to eMedTV Pain Articles containing information on subjects from Clinoril and Weight Gain to Darvocet Medication for Pain. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Clinoril and Weight Gain
    Clinical studies have not shown a link between Clinoril and weight gain that occurs gradually. This eMedTV article, however, does explain the dangers of developing rapid weight gain with Clinoril and offers tips for helping with gradual weight gain.
  • Clinoril Dosage
    The suggested Clinoril dosage for the treatment of most arthritis symptoms is 150 mg, twice a day. This eMedTV segment also contains Clinoril dosing recommendations for acute pain relief and gout and also offers tips for taking the medicine.
  • Clinoril Drug Interactions
    This page on the eMedTV Web site lists medicines that may potentially cause Clinoril drug interactions, including beta blockers, aspirin, and diflunisal. These interactions may increase the levels of Clinoril in your system, among other things.
  • Clinoril Information
    This portion of the eMedTV site features information on Clinoril, an NSAID used to treat pain, stiffness, and other symptoms. This article gives a brief overview of this drug and provides a link to more details.
  • Clinoril Precautions and Warnings
    People who take Clinoril for an extended amount of time may show signs of anemia. This eMedTV page offers more Clinoril precautions and warnings, including other possible side effects to look out for and information on who should not take the drug.
  • Clinoril Side Effects
    This eMedTV resource provides a list of potential side effects that may occur with Clinoril, such as unexplained rash, nausea, and headache. Side effects that should be reported to a doctor and rare but possible problems are also included.
  • Clinoril Uses
    Clinoril uses typically include general pain relief and treatment for symptoms of arthritis. This eMedTV page discusses these and other uses for the drug and also lists possible off-label uses, including the relief of lupus symptoms and migraines.
  • Co-Gesic
    Co-Gesic is licensed for the treatment of moderate to moderately severe pain. This eMedTV page provides a complete overview of Co-Gesic, including information on how it works, tips on taking it, possible side effects, and general precautions.
  • Co-Gesic Drug Information
    This eMedTV page presents some basic information on Co-Gesic, a drug used to treat moderate-to-severe pain. This segment describes the two active ingredients in this product and discusses how they work, and includes a link to learn more.
  • Cogesic
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains that Co-Gesic is a prescription medication used to treat certain types of pain. This page also describes what to do if you take too much of this medication. Cogesic is a common misspelling of Co-Gesic.
  • Common Side Effects of Talacen
    Some of the common side effects of Talacen include drowsiness, nausea, and constipation. This eMedTV Web resource describes other possible problems with this drug, including potentially serious side effects that require immediate medical attention.
  • ConZip
    ConZip is a drug licensed for treating long-term pain in people who need a continuous pain reliever. This eMedTV Web selection contains an explanation of the abuse potential, covers dosing information, lists potential side effects, and more.
  • ConZip Dosage
    Taking ConZip capsules once daily can help relieve pain in some people. This eMedTV resource examines dosing guidelines for this pain reliever, including details on how your ConZip dosage is determined and tips on how to minimize problems when taking it.
  • ConZip Drug Information
    ConZip is a drug prescribed to treat long-term pain in adults who need an around-the-clock pain reliever. This eMedTV page explores ConZip, including information on why this drug may not be the best choice for some people. It also links to more details.
  • ConZip Drug Interactions
    If you drink alcohol or use certain supplements while using ConZip, it may cause dangerous complications. This eMedTV page lists other products that may cause interactions with ConZip and describes the problems that may occur when combining these drugs.
  • ConZip Side Effects
    Some of the common side effects of ConZip include dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. This eMedTV page contains detailed lists of problems that occurred during clinical trials on this drug. These lists include common and potentially serious reactions.
  • ConZip Uses
    If you have long-term pain that requires around-the-clock treatment, you may benefit from ConZip. This eMedTV resource examines this pain-relieving use of ConZip, including details on how it works. It also discusses whether it is safe for children.
  • ConZip Warnings and Precautions
    If you have ever had any suicidal thoughts, let your doctor know before taking ConZip. This eMedTV Web selection examines important warnings and precautions for ConZip, including what your doctor needs to know and possible problems the drug can cause.
  • Corisoprodol
    Carisoprodol is a muscle relaxant used to relieve discomfort caused by muscle spasms. This eMedTV segment describes the effects of carisoprodol and offers general dosing information for the drug. Corisprodol is a common misspelling of carisoprodol.
  • Counseling (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy)
    One type of counseling known as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) uses talk therapy to change the way people think about or perceive their pain, in addition to promoting coping skills, stress reduction, and effective ways to deal with the anxiety associated with pain. In a 2011 study, the addition of CBT was found to be significantly better than standard treatment of chronic pain. When combined with regular exercise and standard treatment for pain through primary care, 37 percent of those treated with CBT reported improvements in their overall health and well-being after 9 months, compared to only 8 percent of those treated with standard care.
  • More About Crushing OxyContin
    If OxyContin (oxycodone ER) is crushed, it can be very dangerous and could lead to an overdose. As this eMedTV page explains, chewing or crushing the tablets destroys the special slow-release feature of the tablets.
  • Cyclobenzapine
    As this eMedTV page explains, cyclobenzaprine is used for the temporary treatment of muscle spasms caused by injuries or other muscle problems. This page also covers some general precautions. Cyclobenzapine is a common misspelling of cyclobenzaprine.
  • Cyclobenzaprene
    Cyclobenzaprine is a drug licensed to treat muscle spasms due to injuries or other muscle problems. This eMedTV article offers general precautions for taking this product. Cyclobenzaprene is a common misspelling of cyclobenzaprine.
  • Cyclobenzaprin
    Cyclobenzaprine is a medicine prescribed for the treatment of certain types of muscle spasms. This eMedTV page further discusses cyclobenzaprine, including possible side effects and dosing tips. Cyclobenzaprin is a common misspelling of cyclobenzaprine.
  • Cyclobenzaprine
    Cyclobenzaprine is a prescription drug that is licensed for the treatment of muscle spasms. This eMedTV Web page describes cyclobenzaprine in more detail, explaining what types of muscle spasms the drug can treat and listing potential side effects.
  • Cyclobenzaprine Dosing
    The recommended starting cyclobenzaprine dose is 5 mg three times daily. This portion of the eMedTV library contains other important cyclobenzaprine dosing guidelines, including suggestions on when and how to take the muscle relaxant.
  • Cyclobenzaprine ER
    Cyclobenzaprine ER is a muscle relaxant used for treating muscle spasms due to injury or other problems. This eMedTV resource describes how cyclobenzaprine ER works, explains when and how to take the drug, and lists side effects that may occur.
  • Cyclobenzaprine ER Dosage
    The recommended cyclobenzaprine ER dosage for most people is 15 mg once daily. This part of the eMedTV Web site provides more cyclobenzaprine ER dosing information, including suggestions on how and when to take the medication.
  • Cyclobenzaprine ER Medication Info
    Do you need info on cyclobenzaprine ER? This page of the eMedTV archives presents a brief look at this medication, explaining what it is used for, how often you take it, and what to discuss with your healthcare provider before beginning treatment.
  • Cyclobenzaprine Hydrochloride (HCl) Information
    This eMedTV article contains some basic drug information on cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride (HCl), a muscle relaxant. Side effects, warnings, and dosing guidelines are covered in this selection, and a link to more details is included.
  • Cyclobenziprine
    As this eMedTV page explains, cyclobenzaprine is prescribed to treat muscle spasms. This page offers a brief overview of cyclobenzaprine and discusses the factors that may affect your dosage. Cyclobenziprine is a common misspelling of cyclobenzaprine.
  • Daravon
    Darvon is a prescription medication that is used to treat mild to moderate pain. This page from the eMedTV library explains how often Darvon should be taken and lists potential side effects of the drug. Daravon is a common misspelling of Darvon.
  • Darone
    Darvon is a prescription narcotic pain medication. This article from the eMedTV Web site describes Darvon in more detail, lists some of its potential side effects, and links to more information about the drug. Darone is a common misspelling of Darvon.
  • Darvacet
    Darvocet is a prescription pain medicine specifically approved to treat mild to moderate pain. This eMedTV page describes Darvocet in more detail and lists some of the potential side effects of this drug. Darvacet is a common misspelling of Darvocet.
  • Darvacette
    Darvocet is a prescription pain reliever that contains a narcotic drug. This eMedTV resource describes Darvocet in more detail and provides general warnings and precautions for this medication. Darvacette is a common misspelling of Darvocet.
  • Darvan
    Available only by prescription, Darvon is used to treat pain. This selection from the eMedTV archives explains when and how to take Darvon and lists some of the potential side effects of the drug. Darvan is a common misspelling of Darvon.
  • Darvaset
    Darvocet is a narcotic drug often prescribed to treat mild-to-moderate pain. This page on the eMedTV Web site explains how often Darvocet should be taken and offers general warnings for this medicine. Darvaset is a common misspelling of Darvocet.
  • Darveset
    The prescription pain medication Darvocet is used to relieve mild to moderate pain. This page from the eMedTV archives explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this narcotic drug. Darveset is a common misspelling of Darvocet.
  • Darvicet
    Darvocet is a narcotic drug that can be prescribed to help relieve mild to moderate pain. This eMedTV article offers general warnings for this drug and lists some of its potential side effects. Darvicet is a common misspelling of Darvocet.
  • Darviset
    Darvocet is a prescription narcotic drug commonly used to treat mild to moderate pain. This eMedTV Web page explains how often it should be taken and lists potential side effects of the medication. Darviset is a common misspelling of Darvocet.
  • Darvocet
    Darvocet is a medication that is approved for the treatment of mild-to-moderate pain. This page from the eMedTV library explains how the drug works, describes the effects of this medicine, and provides a list of potential side effects.
  • Darvocet A500
    The recommended starting dosage for Darvocet A500 is one tablet every four hours as needed for pain. This eMedTV article also offers dosing guidelines for Darvocet-N 50 and Darvocet-N 100, and includes warnings on limiting your acetaminophen intake.
  • Darvocet Abuse
    There are many dangers associated with Darvocet abuse and addiction. As this article from the eMedTV Web site explains, taking more Darvocet than recommended can result in breathing problems, extreme drowsiness, coma, and even death.
  • Darvocet Addiction
    Darvocet (propoxyphene/acetaminophen) is a drug that can be habit-forming. This eMedTV resource lists possible signs of Darvocet addiction and explores the physical, emotional, and social consequences of addiction.
  • Darvocet and Alcohol
    If you are taking Darvocet (propoxyphene/acetaminophen), it is generally recommended to avoid alcohol. As this eMedTV segment explains, Darvocet and alcohol are both central nervous system depressants that can slow the functioning of the brain.
  • Darvocet and Breastfeeding
    Darvocet (propoxyphene/acetaminophen) passes through breast milk in humans. As this eMedTV page explains, although breastfeeding and Darvocet are usually considered to be compatible, some problems have been reported in infants exposed to the drug.
  • Darvocet and Hair Loss
    Hair loss does not appear to be a side effect of Darvocet (propoxyphene/acetaminophen). This page from the eMedTV archives offers more information on Darvocet and hair loss, and explains what you should do if this side effect does occur.
  • Darvocet and Pregnancy
    Darvocet (propoxyphene/acetaminophen) may not be safe for use during pregnancy. This eMedTV segment contains more information on pregnancy and Darvocet, and describes some of the problems that may occur if a pregnant woman uses this drug.
  • Darvocet and Soma
    It is generally recommended that you do not combine Darvocet and Soma (a muscle relaxant). This eMedTV resource describes the problems that may occur if these drugs are taken together and lists other medications that may cause an interaction.
  • Darvocet and Valium
    It is generally recommended that you do not combine Darvocet and Valium. This eMedTV Web page explains what may happen if these two drugs are taken together and provides a list of other medications that may interact with Darvocet.
  • Darvocet Contraindications
    Darvocet (propoxyphene/acetaminophen) should not be given to people who are suicidal or addiction prone. This eMedTV article discusses other Darvocet contraindications and offers general warnings and precautions for this medication.
  • Darvocet Dangers
    A Darvocet overdose (either accidental or intentional) can be lethal within 15 minutes. This page on the eMedTV Web site covers other Darvocet dangers and describes some of the common side effects that have been reported with this medication.
  • Darvocet Dosage
    For Darvocet A500, the recommended dosage is one tablet every four hours as needed for pain. This eMedTV article also offers Darvocet dosage recommendations for Darvocet-N 50 and Darvocet-N 100, and includes tips for using this medication.
  • Darvocet Drug Information
    Darvocet is a narcotic pain medication that is classified as a controlled substance. This eMedTV page contains other important Darvocet drug information, including an explanation of what you should discuss with your doctor before using this medicine.
  • Darvocet Drug Interactions
    Drug interactions could occur if you take MAOIs, warfarin, or certain beta blockers with Darvocet. This eMedTV Web page describes the potential effects of these interactions and lists other medicines that may cause drug interactions with Darvocet.
  • Darvocet Generic Names
    There are currently both brand-name and generic versions of Darvocet. Generic names of this medication, as this eMedTV resource explains, include propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen, propoxyphene/APAP, and propoxyphene-N/APAP.
  • Darvocet in Early Pregnancy
    At this time, it is not known whether Darvocet is safe for use during pregnancy. As this section of the eMedTV library explains, it is assumed that the risk for birth defects due to this medicine is greatest when you take Darvocet in early pregnancy.
  • Darvocet Indications
    Darvocet is a prescription narcotic drug used for relieving mild to moderate pain (with or without a fever). This eMedTV article discusses Darvocet indications in more detail and explains whether there are any recommended "off-label" uses for this drug.
  • Darvocet Information
    Darvocet is a prescription medicine used for relieving mild to moderate pain. This eMedTV segment provides more Darvocet information, including a list of potential side effects of the drug and information on general warnings and precautions.
  • Darvocet Ingredients
    Darvocet (propoxyphene/acetaminophen) contains numerous ingredients. As this eMedTV resource explains, the two main Darvocet ingredients are propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen (although the drug is also made up of various inactive ingredients).
  • Darvocet Medication for Pain
    Darvocet is a prescription pain medication that contains a narcotic and acetaminophen. As this eMedTV segment explains, doctors may prescribe Darvocet for pain that is short-term (such as pain after a dental procedure) or long-term.
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